“The Network Case Is Russia’s Disgrace”

Natalia Sivohina
Facebook
October 18, 2020

“The Network Case is Russia’s disgrace.” Photo of Natalia Sivohina courtesy of her Facebook page

One of the most vile criminal cases in our country turned three years old today. Although it is far from the only such case, it has been very revealing. I remember the desperate social media posts by the young ladies from the [Petersburg] Public Monitoring Commission, Yana Teplitskaya and Katya Kosarevskaya, when the relatives and the lawyers looked for the first people interrogated as part of the case. FSB “investigators” communicated with them using stun guns.

Then there were the mendacious TV broadcasts by propagandists, numerous letters in support of the guys, and the rivers of sleaze in “bespoke” articles and posts. And there were the huge sentences [for all of the defendants] and tuberculosis for two of them—for conversations, for idiotic videos, for confessions obtained under duress, which the young men, yesterday’s children, recanted in the courtroom. The appeals hearing for the Penza defendants is currently underway. Now everybody knows the names and faces of the nighttime torturers and the scum who concocted this case in broad daylight. I really hope to live to see the trial at which those fraudsters will get what they have coming to them. And to see the guys released and testify against them.

Dear universe or whatever your name is, please make it happen sooner rather than later.

Translated by the Russian Reader. Please read my previous posts on the Network Case (see the list, below), and go to Rupression.com to find out how you can show your solidarity with the defendants in the case.

#NetworkCase 

#free64

sentsov-free 64

The logo, above, was designed by the fabulous Petersburg activists Grigory Mikhnov-Voytenko and Natalia Sivohina, who had it printed on t-shirts.

You should do the same.

The slogan on the bottom reads, “Your freedom is our freedom.”

“64” refers to the number of Ukrainian political prisoners currently incarcerated by the Russian Federation. (Although there are claims that the Kremlin has imprisoned 69 Ukrainian political prisoners.)

Ukrainian political prisoner and filmmaker Oleg Sentsov, who is currently serving a 20-year sentence of trumped-up charges in a maximum-security prison camp north of the Arctic Circle, has been on an indefinite hunger strike for nearly three weeks. His only demand is that the Kremlin release all the Ukrainian political prisoners it has in captivity.

So, as some of Grigory and Natalia’s interlocutors suggested on Facebook, the hashtag could read, “#Free64_SaveSentsov.”

In any case, if you write to them via Facebook, they will be happy to send you the full-sized file of the logo for printing on t-shirts, cloth bags or any other convenient, publicly visible surface.

sentsov-sivohinaGrigory and Natalia modeling the Oleg Sentsov solidarity t-shirts they designed. Photo courtesy of their Facebook pages. All of progressive humanity should be wearing t-shirts like these to bring attention to Sentsov’s struggle against the Kremlin.