This Silence

Update: 20 people are dead, 3 children including. 90 people are fighting for their lives.

Imagine Vienna being bombed like that. Or Paris. Or NYC.

Vinnytsia, a city in Central Ukraine, was bombed today. 8 people are murdered. 30 — injured.

Meanwhile, fucking Russia is bombing schools, shopping malls, museums in Ukraine. Every fucking day. And y’all are silent. I wish I knew what is international solidarity, but now it seems like a joke.

There is something extremely wrong about it. This silence I am not ready to face. 9/11 is an everyday reality in Ukraine.

Source: Yulia Kishchuk, Facebook, 14 July 2022


Virtuoso photographer Alexander Petrosyan posted this picture of four generations of Petersburgers peacefully and safely riding the tram in Russia’s Northern Capital earlier today on Facebook.


Vinnytsia is a mere 1,400 kilometers (870 miles) straight south of Saint Petersburg on the E95. Image courtesy of Google Maps

Leningrad Then, Petersburg Now

Leningrad Then

Even with the Soviet visual propaganda, the city remained spacious and limpid. But the current [powers that be] have killed everything, although they did restore the gates of the Winter Palace.
—Comment on Facebook

Leningrad 1974. Footage courtesy of Footageforpro.com

Leningrad (Alexei Uchitel, dir., 1978)

Petersburg Now
What follows is a annotated, partial pictorial record of a long walk I took recently in the northern parts of inner Petersburg with a group of local psychogeographers and historical preservationists. The immediate impulse for our walk was the news developers had begun constructing a block of flats cheek by jowl with the renowned power station for the Red Banner Textile Factory, designed by the Jewish German architect Erich Mendelsohn. Worse, it transpired that the developers had the moxie to dub their little contribution to catastrophic urban redevelopment the Mendelsohn Housing Complex, as if they had received the great architect’s blessing for their vandalism from beyond the grave. Continue reading “Leningrad Then, Petersburg Now”